One of the defining features of Warne Maxima scope rings is that they are vertically split. Due to their unique design, one of the most common questions we get is “Why is the vertical split better than horizontal?” That is a difficult question to answer because both designs work, both will mount a scope to a firearm, and both will hold that scope in place. While I will not argue which style of ring is “better”, there are distinct attributes of each design that directly contribute to a rings strength, holding ability, ease of installation and aesthetics. The most obvious difference is that the screw placement is on the top and bottom of the scope tube, rather than the sides. One advantage to this design is the slim side profile. In the photo below, you see a Meopta Meostar R2 scope, and the slim profile of the fixed Maxima rings allows the shooter a clear, unobstructed view of the illumination control.  This feature works equally well with side adjustable parallax knobs.

14R7M Ruger M77 rings, Meopta Meostar R2 scope

The vertical split greatly affects the way a scope is secured. If we were to compare the difference in clamping pressure between the vertical and horizontal split ring on a scope tube, we would find the horizontal split to clamp like a vise. There are 2 separate sides that come together evenly, applying pressure to the top and bottom of the scope tube. This leaves 2 gaps, one on each side where the halves screw together. A vertical split closes one of those gaps, so the ring applies pressure more like a hose clamp. The bottom screws are tightened, mechanically closing the bottom gap. This means that the top of the ring must flex and conform to the scope tube when you tighten the top screws. This leaves only one gap at the top of the ring.

 

The properties that give Maxima rings their incredible holding ability are the same features that allow proper installation without the need for lapping. Maxima rings automatically center themselves on the base, so the chance of ring misalignment is greatly reduced. Since the rings apply pressure like a hose clamp, and there is only 1 small gap not making contact with the tube, Maxima rings have much more surface contact with the scope right out of the package when compared to competitor’s horizontally split rings.  Since Maxima rings do not require any additional processes like lapping, they are very simple to install. Remove the rings from the package, then install them on your firearm, that’s it.

Horizontally split rings can make leveling your reticle a challenge. When you tighten one side of the ring, it tends to pull the scope in that direction. this means you are constantly checking to make sure the reticle is in the same position you started with. With some ring designs, you need to estimate the amount the scope will turn during installation, and this typically takes several attempts before you can get the reticle close to level.  With a vertically split ring, there are no forces to twist the scope when the rings are being tightened.  Since the ring wraps around the tube and tightens at the top, there is no need to constantly adjust the scope before you torque the screws to 25 inch pounds.

Here at the Warne factory, we hear stories all the time from customers.  Everything from guns falling off cliffs, to ATV crashes, to guns being dropped out of tree stands. We love to hear from those customers because in those events where something has failed, or gone wrong to the point that damage should be done, their Warne rings hold strong.  They are typically amazed that the rifles do not shift zero, even when other components of the gun did not fare as well.   Maxima rings have proven to be the strongest scope mounts on the market, and with steel ring construction, lifetime warranty, American made quality and precision at an affordable price make Warne Maxima scope rings one of the best values in their class. Pick up a set of Maxima scope rings and experience the advantages of the vertical split. Set your sights on Warne.